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A boost for steel: A smarter and safer way to tackle corrosion
A boost for steel: A smarter and safer way to tackle corrosion
A team from Swansea University which is developing a new "smart release" corrosion inhibitor, for use in coated steel products, has won the Materials Science Venture Prize awarded by The Worshipful Company of Armourers and Brasiers.
Making some of the world's most durable materials corrosion-resistant
Making some of the world's most durable materials corrosion-resistant
Borides are among the hardest and most heat-resistant substances on the planet, but their Achilles' heel, like so many materials', is that they oxidize at high temperatures. Oxidation is the chemical reaction commonly known as corrosion or rusting R...
River bottom profiles for pipeline integrity management
River bottom profiles for pipeline integrity management
When conducting ongoing pipeline integrity management programs, it is vital for operators to have access to as much information regarding potential corrosive activity on their pipeline as possible. The data provided from river bottom profiles (RBP) off...
Soy-based BPA alternative coating wins award
Soy-based BPA alternative coating wins award
A coating technology which could be used to replace Bisphenol A (BPA) in a variety of applications has been awarded second place in a category at the 2016 Bio-Based Innovation Awards. The soy-based resin has corrosion resistance for aluminum and steel ...
The coatings industry mourns the loss of Jim Johnson
The coatings industry mourns the loss of Jim Johnson
James R. Johnson, founder of CHLOR*RID International, passed away on Tuesday, June 20, 2017 at his home in Yaak, Montana, of natural causes. He had been active in several of the NACE coatings technical committees since 1991 and was active with the Soci...
NASA tests laser-printed alloy for future rocket parts
NASA tests laser-printed alloy for future rocket parts
Engineers at NASA say that laser 3-D printing key components for launch rockets made from different metal alloys could cut the cost of future engines by a third — with the time required to make them slashed by half.